A Fascinating Look Into The User Experience Design Process

Hello readers, it’s Amanda McWhorter. As a writer at Brand Buddha, I’m often tasked to dive into the unfamiliar.

While doing research for Brand Buddha’s newest articles on the user experience design process, I realized how misunderstood the process is and how little I knew. Luckily, Brand Buddha has an expert at UX in its midst. So, I kidnapped* our UX Designer and held him hostage until he answered all of my questions.

A Fascinating Interview Into How The User Experience Design Process Evolves

Amanda –

Let’s start with something easy, (she said with a fake smile, she was happy to be here, after all—oh, so happy), how would you describe your role?

Brett – 

I’m the defender of the user—think of me as the user’s Iron Man. I want to put a suit of armor around the world! Ahem—sorry, I got distracted… UX! Right. I ensure that the voice of the user is heard by our clients and internal teams. I combine my understanding of user behavior, marketing, design, and development to create documentation, perform tests, and create designs that help inform the final product. At Buddha, that’s usually a website but overall can extend to all things that have been designed by and for a human.

Amanda- 

What are some common misconceptions about UX?

Brett –

“A UXer must have all the answers.” A UX designer doesn’t have any answers—at least not before testing. Most problems are unique to an individual organization. To obtain those answers, a UX designer relies on a process called design thinking—ideate, build, and test—to validate whether a design meets the desired outcome. The more iterations that occur on the design thinking process, the closer a product will get to achieving a desirable design for the end-user.

That said, UX designers are informed on sets of foundational behavioral data, design patterns, and the latest UI trends and those inform specific design choices.

Amanda –

You rely on a lot of statistics about user experience, which ones do people find the most shocking?

Brett –

“Talking to the user is expensive and not worth the investment.” Studies show the ROI of a usability redesign on websites increases desired metrics by 135% on average. Also, the idea that you need a large pool of users to achieve statistical significance to testing—a pool of five users is enough to identify 85% of the usability problems according to NNG.

Amanda – 

Why do organizations need to think about user experience when designing and presenting anything to audiences?

Brett – 

ROI. When customers are using your product they are trying to solve a problem. Whether it be X, Y, or Z, the more you know about your customers and their problems, the more likely and able we are to pinpoint areas of improvement and increase overall satisfaction. The more your customers are satisfied with their experience, the more likely they are to keep using it and recommend it to others. This retention and referral both add up to real value.

Additionally, the more problem spaces you identify with your existing audience, the more likely you are to discover additional opportunities or to solve/discover completely new audiences to serve. 

Amanda – 

Is the user experience design process something that stays the same with every project? (Brett chuckles vigorously under his old man sweater that protects him from the arctic air relentlessly blowing through the Buddha compound) Okay, well, why not?

Brett – 

Every client, product, or system to be designed has its own problem spaces to solve for. For instance, what’s a problem for Apple, is not a problem for your business. There is no one solution for a customer. While there are patterns in user behavior that help to form hypotheses, the process stays the same—ideate, build, test. 

Amanda – 

Do you have any standout user experience design examples showing how the lack of UX has sunk an organization? What can we learn from these mistakes?

Brett – 

A quick search of Wikipedia returns results for failed projects that could have saved billions of dollars if they employed UX methods. 

Outside of money, good UX design saves lives. Recently, the US Navy is replacing all of its touchscreen controls in their “state-of-the-art” destroyers after the deaths of 10 US sailors were attributed to a lack of control those screens gave naval bridge operators. “The design of the John S McCain’s touch-screen steering and thrust control system increased the likelihood of the operator errors that led to the collision.” 

Solid UX testing could have shown, prior to spending billions, that the controls were insufficient for the vessels operators.

Amanda – 

Why do you think user experience testing is so important? Doesn’t research alone provide you with the means to know your audience?

Brett – 

The human brain is the most complicated machine in the universe. While research is essential to starting any design project, until you put a solution on paper and show it to a human brain, you won’t understand how that human wetware interprets your solution.

Amanda – 

Thanks for your input, Brett! You’ve really made sense of the process for me. You’re free to go.

Brett – 

You’re welcome, I think. Can you untie me now?

There it is. All the information you need to understand the user experience. And you didn’t have to commit a felony to get it. Glorious day. Thanks for reading our interview with Brand Buddha’s UX Designer*. See you next time.

*No Brett Cipperly’s were harmed in the making of this interview.*

 

Alternative Text
About The Author

Amanda McWhorter is a woman on a mission. Harnessing the power of imagination and the world around her, she lives in a land where spaceships cruise from star to star and dragons can manipulate magic. When she's trapped in the real world, she puts away myth and fantasy to craft well-researched and strategically compelling copy perfect for every muggle.

Amanda McWhorter
Content Manager

2019-09-09T22:52:47+00:00August 29th, 2019|

Sign up for our newsletter for our latest industry trends, news, and more.

0 Shares
Share
Tweet
Pin
Share